Italy: The government will ban the use of cash in transactions over 5,000 euros

http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKTRE64N36720100524

An austerity budget due to be approved by Italy’s cabinet on Tuesday cuts public-sector hiring and pay, temporarily delays retirement for some state workers and reduces funds to local government.

The two-year package, expected to narrow the 2011 budget deficit by around 13 billion euros (11 billion pound), will be outlined at a news conference late on Tuesday after the cabinet meeting, which starts at 1600 GMT.

A weekend draft of the measures obtained by Reuters said only 20 percent of those who leave the public sector between 2011 and 2013 would be replaced, and it cut transfers to municipal and regional authorities by 2 billion euros in 2011 and 3.8 billion euros in 2012.

The draft budget, which comes as polls show Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s popularity declining, includes cuts in the politically-sensitive area of health spending, trimmed by 0.4 billion euros next year and 1.1 billion euros in 2012.

Spending by government ministries, including pay, is reduced by about percent per year from 2011-13.

Those who would have earned the right to retire in mid-2011 and at the end of 2011, according to the so-called retirement “windows,” must remain at work for a further six months.

According a memo of talking points used by Economy Minister Giulio Tremonti in a speech to the economic committee of Berlusconi’s People of Freedom (PDL) party, the measures will also include an amnesty on some illegal construction.

The memo also says the measures will try to reduce government spending on pharmaceuticals by enacting stricter controls and using more generic drugs in the public health system.

“The deficit cuts will be worth 24 billion (over two years),” said government spokesman Paolo Bonaiuti, reiterating the centre-right government would not raise taxes. “We will not put our hands in the pockets of Italians.”

POLITICAL WINDS

In an effort to crack down on widespread tax evasion, the government will ban the use of cash in transactions over 5,000 euros, lowering the ceiling from 12,500 euros, Tremonti’s memo said.

The deficit cuts, said to be worth around 1.6 percent of Italy’s GDP, are aimed at ensuring the budget deficit falls to below the EU’s 3 percent ceiling by 2012.

It follows financial market concerns in recent weeks over peripheral euro zone countries’ public finances, which has returned Italy to the spotlight.

Italy aims to cut its deficit to 2.7 percent of GDP by 2012 from 5.3 percent last year — well below the EU average — thanks to restraint in stimulus spending during the crisis.

“The budgetary correction envisaged by the government is a step in the right direction,” Unicredit wrote in a report on Monday, adding a return to growth this year would also help to slow growth in welfare spending.

However, the cuts may dent the government’s flagging poll ratings.

A survey published in the Corriere della Sera newspaper on Monday showed the number of Italians who felt Berlusconi’s government had performed “very badly” doubled from a year ago to 26 percent, while 38 percent said it had been a “little disappointing.

“Europe is asking us for strict budget cuts,” said Public Administration Minister Renato Brunetta, adding that there would be a series of meetings before the cabinet to build consensus for the measures.

Union leaders, who have said they are prepared to back the measures as long as they do not unfairly hit the poor, are expected to hold a news conference after the meeting to present their reaction.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/10157432.stm

The Italian government has approved austerity measures worth 24 billion euros (£20bn; $29bn) for the years 2011-2012.

The announcement makes Italy the latest eurozone country to announce cuts in an effort to reduce the gap between spending and earnings.

The UK and Danish governments also this week announced plans to curb spending.

Italy will take measures to reduce public sector pay and will put a freeze on new recruitment.

Public sector pensions and local government spending are also expected to be hit.

Added to these, a clampdown on tax avoidance is also planned.

The cuts are equal to some 1.6% of gross domestic product (GDP).

Similar reductions in spending measures have already been announced by Greece, Spain and Portugal.

———-

30 billion dollar austerity measures for italy now..pain coming,.will they riot?

welcome to the NWO..where cash is hated..no transactions over 5k..wow..wtf?

401

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~ by seeker401 on May 27, 2010.

9 Responses to “Italy: The government will ban the use of cash in transactions over 5,000 euros”

  1. “they” want at cashless society for “they” plan

  2. thanks seek,I wonder when will they apply one world currency and how???

    • i would say when they crash the fiat currencies..starting in europe now..and moving to the usa end of june..they may go to the IMF “currency” or will go to gold backed again in a worse case scenario..all bad news for us

  3. [...] logical next step for the U.S. government would be to follow a recent Italy's lead and outlaw outright the use of cash for most transactions, except for small ones, thus providing the government even more minute [...]

  4. [...] step for the U.S. government would be to follow a recent Italy’s lead and outlaw outright the use of cash for most transactions, except for small ones, thus providing the government even more minute [...]

  5. [...] step for the U.S. government would be to follow a recent Italy’s lead and outlaw outright the use of cash for most transactions, except for small ones, thus providing the government even more minute [...]

  6. [...] step for the U.S. government would be to follow a recent Italy’s lead and outlaw outright the use of cash for most transactions, except for small ones, thus providing the government even more minute [...]

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