Eternal 5D data storage could record the history of humankind

eternal5ddat

1-eternal5ddat

http://phys.org/news/2016-02-eternal-5d-storage-history-humankind.html

Scientists at the University of Southampton have made a major step forward in the development of digital data storage that is capable of surviving for billions of years.

Using nanostructured glass, scientists from the University’s Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) have developed the recording and retrieval processes of five dimensional (5D) digital data by femtosecond laser writing.

The storage allows unprecedented properties including 360 TB/disc data capacity, thermal stability up to 1,000°C and virtually unlimited lifetime at room temperature (13.8 billion years at 190°C ) opening a new era of eternal data archiving. As a very stable and safe form of portable memory, the technology could be highly useful for organisations with big archives, such as national archives, museums and libraries, to preserve their information and records.

The technology was first experimentally demonstrated in 2013 when a 300 kb digital copy of a text file was successfully recorded in 5D.

Now, major documents from human history such as Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), Newton’s Opticks, Magna Carta and Kings James Bible, have been saved as digital copies that could survive the human race. A copy of the UDHR encoded to 5D data storage was recently presented to UNESCO by the ORC at the International Year of Light (IYL) closing ceremony in Mexico.

The documents were recorded using ultrafast laser, producing extremely short and intense pulses of light. The file is written in three layers of nanostructured dots separated by five micrometres (one millionth of a metre).

The self-assembled nanostructures change the way light travels through glass, modifying polarisation of light that can then be read by combination of optical microscope and a polariser, similar to that found in Polaroid sunglasses.

Coined as the ‘Superman memory crystal’, as the glass memory has been compared to the “memory crystals” used in the Superman films, the data is recorded via self-assembled nanostructures created in fused quartz. The information encoding is realised in five dimensions: the size and orientation in addition to the three dimensional position of these nanostructures.

Professor Peter Kazansky, from the ORC, says: “It is thrilling to think that we have created the technology to preserve documents and information and store it in space for future generations. This technology can secure the last evidence of our civilisation: all we’ve learnt will not be forgotten.”

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“The storage allows unprecedented properties including 360 TB/disc data capacity, thermal stability up to 1,000°C and virtually unlimited lifetime at room temperature (13.8 billion years at 190°C ) opening a new era of eternal data archiving.”

thats a lot of memory..

“Coined as the ‘Superman memory crystal’, as the glass memory has been compared to the “memory crystals” used in the Superman films, the data is recorded via self-assembled nanostructures created in fused quartz.”

401

~ by seeker401 on February 19, 2016.

7 Responses to “Eternal 5D data storage could record the history of humankind”

  1. So they can save documents of human freedom for posterity in the far-distant future when they have no intention of following the tenants of those documents here in the present.
    I’d laugh, but I’m afraid if I started laughing I couldn’t stop.

  2. I remember an interesting article on ScientificAmerican in 90’s: the author said that his team was nearly ready to produce a commercial version of the holographic memory.
    After that, absolute silence on the argument (http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/holographic-memories/).

    So, if now the mainstream let us know of these wonderful toys, imagine what is the real state of the art… Do you remember HAL9000 memory unit?

    http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/2001/images/2/2f/2001halshutdown.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20091004151612

    • Thanks webrasta, very interesting.
      No content in the article link, though😦

      • exactly, Maria. not a single bit of info…
        hi

        • “Holographic Memories
          After more than 30 years, researchers are on the verge of using holograms to store data in memories that are both fast and vast”
          …nothing more…I would like to read the whole article :/…names f “reaearchers”, researching centers, companies involved…I searched for this article on the web but couldn’t fine anything beyond the title cited here…:/

    • thats the scary part..how advanced is it really?

  3. this could be a boon against memory-holing, if they have a version that is write-once, read-many (WORM).

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