What is at stake in Zambia’s elections?

edgar-lungu4

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-37008989

Zambia is heading for the polls just 18 months after the last presidential election, which saw Edgar Lungu win by less than 28,000 votes. BBC Focus on Africa editor Rachael Akidi looks at the issues in this election.

Zambia has been hailed as one of Africa’s most stable and mature democracies. It has held regular multi-party elections since 1991, including in 2011 when President Rupiah Banda lost, accepted defeat and stepped down.

But this poll is being contested under new rules.

The constitution was amended in response to the deaths of two sitting presidents in less than five years, which meant early elections on both occasions.

Under the new rules, a presidential candidate is required to have a running mate who will become vice-president and take over if the president dies in office.

For the first time, the winner must also secure a minimum of one vote more than 50% of the ballots cast. Otherwise the poll will go into a second round, to be held within 37 days.

This means the president should have gained the support of a wider cross-section of society.

In addition to the election, the people will also be voting in a constitutional referendum on the same day, to decide whether to amend the bill of rights.

This gives all Zambians the right to food, shelter, employment and healthcare.

It also bans homosexual acts, abortion and raises the age of consent to 19.

Some civil society groups have criticised the decision to hold a referendum question in parallel to the general election.

They say amending the bill of rights in the constitution is a matter of such gravity that it should be addressed on its own merits, without subconscious influence from the positions taken by political leaders.

There are nine presidential candidates, with President Lungu, 59, of the ruling Patriotic Front (PF) and Hakainde Hichelema of the United Party for National Development (UPND), 54, the front-runners.

Both men stood in last year’s election, which Mr Lungu narrowly won.

Before becoming president, Mr Lungu, a lawyer, served in Mr Sata’s government as minister for justice and defence. He also held several leadership positions within his party.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Lungu

———-

“Zambia has been hailed as one of Africa’s most stable and mature democracies.”

i see..

“In addition to the election, the people will also be voting in a constitutional referendum on the same day, to decide whether to amend the bill of rights.”

so what does that entail?

“This gives all Zambians the right to food, shelter, employment and healthcare. It also bans homosexual acts, abortion and raises the age of consent to 19.”

uh oh..that wont go down well..

401

~ by seeker401 on August 12, 2016.

4 Responses to “What is at stake in Zambia’s elections?”

  1. Polls close in Zambia after tight presidential race

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap/article-3734363/Zambians-vote-tight-presidential-race.html

  2. Zambia’s President Edgar Lungu declared election winner

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-37086365

    Zambia’s President Edgar Lungu has been re-elected, according to official results, which are being challenged by the main opposition party.
    The electoral commission said Mr Lungu had secured 50.35% in Thursday’s vote, just over the 50% threshold needed to avoid a second round under a new electoral system.
    His main rival, Hakainde Hichilema, who alleges electoral fraud, won 47.67%.
    Earlier, his UPND party withdrew from the ballot verification process.

  3. Reblogged this on World Peace Forum.

  4. […] via What is at stake in Zambia’s elections? — Follow The Money […]

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