How a secretive elite created the EU to build a world government

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/eureferendum/12018877/The-truth-how-a-secretive-elite-created-the-EU-to-build-a-world-government.html

Most students seem to think that Britain was in dire economic straits, and that the European Economic Community – as it was then called – provided an economic engine which could revitalise our economy. Others seem to believe that after the Second World War Britain needed to recast her geopolitical position away from empire, and towards a more realistic one at the heart of Europe. Neither of these arguments, however, makes any sense at all.

The EEC in the 1960s and 1970s was in no position to regenerate anyone’s economy. It spent most of its meagre resources on agriculture and fisheries and had no means or policies to generate economic growth.

When growth did happen, it did not come from the EU. From Ludwig Erhard’s supply-side reforms in West Germany in 1948 to Thatcher’s privatisation of nationalised industry in the Eighties, European growth came from reforms introduced by individual countries which were were copied elsewhere. EU policy has always been either irrelevant or positively detrimental (as was the case with the euro).

Nor did British growth ever really lag behind Europe’s. Sometimes it surged ahead. In the 1950s Western Europe had a growth rate of 3.5 per cent; in the 1960s, it was 4.5 per cent. But in 1959, when Harold Macmillan took office, the real annual growth rate of British GDP, according to the Office of National Statistics, was almost 6 per cent. It was again almost 6 per cent when de Gaulle vetoed our first application to join the EEC in 1963.

In 1973, when we entered the EEC, our annual national growth rate in real terms was a record 7.4 per cent. The present Chancellor would die for such figures. So the economic basket-case argument doesn’t work.

What about geopolitics? What argument in the cold light of hindsight could have been so compelling as to make us kick our Second-World-War Commonwealth allies in the teeth to join a combination of Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, France, Germany and Italy?

Four of these countries held no international weight whatsoever. Germany was occupied and divided. France, meanwhile, had lost one colonial war in Vietnam and another in Algeria. De Gaulle had come to power to save the country from civil war. Most realists must surely have regarded these states as a bunch of losers. De Gaulle, himself a supreme realist, pointed out that Britain had democratic political institutions, world trade links, cheap food from the Commonwealth, and was a global power. Why would it want to enter the EEC?

The answer is that Harold Macmillan and his closest advisers were part of an intellectual tradition that saw the salvation of the world in some form of world government based on regional federations. He was also a close acquaintance of Jean Monnet, who believed the same. It was therefore Macmillan who became the representative of the European federalist movement in the British cabinet.

In a speech in the House of Commons he even advocated a European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) before the real thing had been announced. He later arranged for a Treaty of Association to be signed between the UK and the ECSC, and it was he who ensured that a British representative was sent to the Brussels negotiations following the Messina Conference, which gave birth to the EEC.

In the late 1950s he pushed negotiations concerning a European Free Trade Association towards membership of the EEC. Then, when General de Gaulle began to turn the EEC into a less federalist body, he took the risk of submitting a full British membership application in the hope of frustrating Gaullist ambitions.

His aim, in alliance with US and European proponents of a federalist world order, was to frustrate the emerging Franco-German alliance which was seen as one of French and German nationalism.

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get yourself a history lesson here..

“Harold Macmillan and his closest advisers were part of an intellectual tradition that saw the salvation of the world in some form of world government based on regional federations. He was also a close acquaintance of Jean Monnet, who believed the same. It was therefore Macmillan who became the representative of the European federalist movement in the British cabinet.”

the architects..

401

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~ by seeker401 on December 1, 2016.

7 Responses to “How a secretive elite created the EU to build a world government”

  1. We were always being told we were a basket case with low productivity , lazy , strikers and we had 7% growth rate – but when I look back everything did seem to be buzzing – so its true what Harold said – ” we never had it so good “

  2. Reblogged this on World Peace Forum.

  3. It makes total sense for internationalist to form international bridges geographically centralized. It makes their already performing jobs that much easier. Nationalism in Europe has been for some time a scare term based upon real scary historic national ambitions to dominate other countries. The constant warfare, especially after WW 1 & 2, would tire out Europe unsurprisingly. Fallen human nature will formulate peace/rest, labor, and marriage (offspring) by fallen human ways with always fallen human outcomes.

    That is why I do not put my faith in man, but in Christ alone, and that not by my own will but to God be the glory alone.

  4. does this ‘new world’ has dancing??

    =
    Authorities in Brussels are enforcing one of Europe’s more obscure fiscal levies: a tax on dancing.

    Cafes, bars and clubs must pay the government 40 cents (34p) for every one of their dancing customers, per night. The tax was introduced in 2014, but authorities are clamping down on unpaid fees in the run-up to Christmas.
    One Brussels club, which has been hit with a bill for almost €2,000 for its toe-tapping customers, has even asked revellers to “please stop dancing” using tongue-in-cheek posters on its windows:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/europe/belgium/brussels/articles/brussels-dance-tax-please-stop-dancing/

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