Scientists want to give the atmosphere an antacid

david-keith-300x249

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-12-12/scientists-want-to-give-the-atmosphere-an-antacid-to-relieve-climate-change

As long-term global average temperatures steadily rise, and international efforts to address them steadily fall short, some scientists and engineers are working on increasingly desperate solutions to the symptoms of global climate change.

One approach to “geoengineering” the earth is to mimic the natural atmospheric cooling effect that tends to follow the massive dispersion of sulfur dioxide into the air during a volcanic eruption. There are a few obvious problems with this approach. For instance, it’s unclear what nation or international body would be authorized to release the sulfur dioxide. The chemical is also a pollutant that can cause acid rain. It might indirectly both eat away at the layer of ozone that protects living things from ultraviolet light and warm the lower part of the stratosphere above the tropics, about 19 miles up.

A group of Harvard researchers led by David Keith, a professor of applied physics and public policy, just proposed a different solution in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. An aerosol of calcium carbonate would have a similar cooling effect as sulfur dioxide on the upper atmosphere and help protect the ozone layer as a bonus.

The approach is akin to giving the atmosphere a handful of antacid tablets. The aerosol would block some incoming solar energy and neutralize airborne acid particles that are bad for the ozone.

The new study opens the world’s atmosphere-seeding options beyond sulfur dioxide, which has caused much debate inside and outside the scientific community. Turning to a calcium compound that’s among the most common on earth “could have significantly less environmental risk than sulfate aerosol,” the authors write.

The paper echoes admonishments made last year in a National Research Council study about “albedo modification,” a scientific phrase that means increasing the earth’s ability to reflect incoming sunlight. The committee that undertook the study was “concerned that understanding of the ethical, political, and environmental consequences of an albedo modification action is relatively less advanced than the technical capacity to execute it.”

To put it plainly: Knowing how to do something doesn’t necessarily make doing it a great idea.

***

From 2007:

Environmental scientist David Keith proposes a cheap, effective, shocking means to address climate change: What if we injected a huge cloud of ash into the atmosphere to deflect sunlight and heat?

———-

keith is a psycho..thats all folks..

“An aerosol of calcium carbonate would have a similar cooling effect as sulfur dioxide on the upper atmosphere and help protect the ozone layer as a bonus.”

he wants to change the product but not the spraying..

here he is in 2007:

“Keith proposes a cheap, effective, shocking means to address climate change: What if we injected a huge cloud of ash into the atmosphere to deflect sunlight and heat?”

yeah..right..”playing god”..

“Knowing how to do something doesn’t necessarily make doing it a great idea.”

amen..

401

Advertisements

~ by seeker401 on December 15, 2016.

2 Responses to “Scientists want to give the atmosphere an antacid”

  1. Hello Seeker.

    If any international body was crazy enough to try this one, I’ll bet that the God of Unintended Consequences would have a lot to say.

    I suppose that the stuff in the post is only there so that the meme of “constantly rising temperatures” can be kept alive, despite all evidence to the contrary.

    See you.

    Andrew Farquharson.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: