Top US general calls for “a few thousand” more troops in Afghanistan

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https://www.rt.com/usa/376874-afghanistan-troops-increase-stalemate/

After 15 years, much bloodshed and hundreds of billions of dollars spent, the US should re-escalate its troop level in Afghanistan, a top US military commander says, to properly train Afghan troops amid ongoing advances of insurgent fighters.

Calling the situation in Afghanistan a “stalemate,” Army General John Nicholson told the US Senate Armed Services Committee that while he has enough troops for counterrterrorism operations against the likes of the Taliban, Al-Qaeda and Islamic State fighters, he would like several thousand more in order to boost capabilities of Afghan security forces. Nicholson said any troop injections could come from the US military or NATO nations.

“I have adequate resources in my counterterrorism mission,” Nicholson said Thursday, according to reports. “In my train, advise and assist mission, however, we have a shortfall of a few thousand. This is in the NATO train, advise and assist mission, so it can come from America or its allies.”

About 8,400 US troops and about 6,400 NATO soldiers remain in Afghanistan following the large-scale NATO troop reduction there in 2014. US-led forces entered Afghanistan to remove Taliban control more than 15 years ago following the attacks on the US of September 11, 2001.

Counterterror missions can be conducted with temporary support from US troops stationed in other nations, he said, according to The Hill.

“When we need to do additional operations, we can surge assets into the country,” Nicholson told the committee. He added: “This has proven to be a successful tactic.”

To break the current “stalemate,” however, would require an increase in troops stationed in Afghanistan in order to adequately train Afghan forces, he said. He also specifically called for increased funding for Afghanistan’s air force.

“This investment which we are requesting the Afghan air force will help them, as you mentioned, to take over responsibility for their own close air support,” he said. “And even more importantly, this then will to an offensive capability that allows them to overmatch the Taliban or any other group on the battlefield anywhere around the country.”

The US has spent well more than $750 billion in Afghanistan since 2001, according to the National Priorities Project.

———-

just another few thousand..you wont miss them..

“To break the current “stalemate,” however, would require an increase in troops stationed in Afghanistan in order to adequately train Afghan forces, he said. He also specifically called for increased funding for Afghanistan’s air force.”

this shit is endless..

“The US has spent well more than $750 billion in Afghanistan since 2001, according to the National Priorities Project.”

401

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~ by seeker401 on February 13, 2017.

17 Responses to “Top US general calls for “a few thousand” more troops in Afghanistan”

  1. They want to make sure the poppies are safe in their hands

  2. Reblogged this on World Peace Forum.

  3. Game-changers ahead on the (long) Maritime Silk Road
    From the Bab al-Mandab to the strait of Malacca, from the strait of Hormuz to the strait of Lombok, all the way to the key logistical hub of Diego Garcia 2,500 miles southeast of Hormuz, the question pops up: How will the unpredictable new normal in Washington – which is not exactly China-friendly – affect the wider Indian Ocean?

    At play are way more than key chokepoints in an area that straddles naval supply chains and through which also flows almost 40% of the oil that powers Asian-Pacific economies. This is about the future of the Maritime Silk Road, a key component of the Chinese One Belt, One Road (OBOR), and thus about how Big Power politics will unfold in a key realm of the Rimland.

    India imports almost 80% of its energy from the Middle East via the Indian Ocean. Thus, for Delhi, protection of supply chains must be the norm, as in the current drive to develop three carrier battle groups and at least 160 naval vessels, including submarines, before 2022.
    http://thesaker.is/game-changers-ahead-on-the-long-maritime-silk-road/

    • This is about the future of the Maritime Silk Road, a key component of the Chinese One Belt, One Road (OBOR), and thus about how Big Power politics will unfold in a key realm of the Rimland.

      • One-Belt-One-Road initiative and Afghanistan

        The silk road through Afghanistan

        The One-Belt-One-Road (OBOR) Initiative is a regional economic cooperation framework, proposed by Chinese President Xi Jinping, in October 2013, that focuses on connectivity between China and the rest of Eurasia. It consists of two main components, the land-based “Silk Road Economic Belt” and the ocean-based “Maritime Silk Road.” The initiative calls for the integration of the region into a cohesive economic area by building infrastructure, increasing cultural exchanges, and broadening trade.

        Northern, central and southern belts are proposed, with the northern belt going through Central Asia, Russia to Europe; the central belt traversing Central Asia, West Asia to the Persian Gulf and the Mediterranean; and the southern belt starting from China and proceeding to Southeast Asia, South Asia, and the Indian Ocean. Given its location at the crossroads of Central, South, and Southwest Asia, Afghanistan is poised to benefit from and partner with China through the OBOR Initiative.

        On August 25, 2016, the first train carrying freight containers left Nantong (just north of Shanghai) in eastern China and—after passing through Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan—reached the northern Afghan border town and port of Hairatan on September 7, 2016 (7300 kilometers in fourteen days) carrying USD $4 million in commercial goods. Signaling the start of a new “Sino-Afghanistan Special Railway Transportation Project” that can reduce trading costs between the two countries by (est.) 30%, two trains are now scheduled each month: from China, they will bring, for example, textiles, electronic products, and construction materials; returning from Afghanistan, the trains will bring, for instance, marble, leather, wool, cashmere, saffron, dried fruit, and pine seed. In July, Kabul-Urumqi flights also resumed.

        Under the umbrella of the One-Belt-One-Road Initiative, these efforts follow from a state visit of the Afghan Government’s Chief Executive Officer, Dr. Abdullah Abdullah, to China, where the Afghan and Chinese Foreign Ministers signed an OBOR Memorandum of Understanding on 16 May 2016 in Beijing.

        Among other shared goals, the MOU expresses a commitment that “The two sides shall jointly promote cooperation on the One-Belt-One-Road Initiative in a bid to realize the goal of common development, and translate the advantages of solid political ties, economic complementarities and people-to-people exchanges into pragmatic cooperation in an effort to promote increasing economic growth.”

        With considerable human talent and financial resources attached to it, the OBOR Initiative has the potential to serve as an integral part of the Afghan Government’s Infrastructure and Connectivity Development and Private Sector Development National Priority Programs.
        http://recca.af/one-belt-one-road-initiative-and-afghanistan/

  4. 2017: The rise of the Sinosphere and the Digital Silk Road
    February 2, 2017

    The continued rise of the Sinosphere (the East Asian cultural sphere that has been historically influenced by China) in the digital economy is unquestionable and worth watching closely in 2017.
    The Silk Road — the famous trading route traveled by Marco Polo — enabled the flow of culture, ideas and goods from the East to the West, and vice versa, in ancient times. Now, we’re seeing the growth of the Digital Silk Road, which may eventually come to rival Silicon Valley as a center of the innovation universe.
    Right now all eyes are on the East, where new ideas are formulating and technological innovations are being developed.
    Need proof? China’s Huawei is now the world’s largest telecommunications manufacturer and has started to penetrate Europe and Canada with its eyes now on the U.S. Tencent’s WeChat has exploded onto the social network scene and beyond. And Chinese IT and digital innovation labs and offices, along with Chinese venture capitalist firms, are popping up in Silicon Valley and elsewhere in the U.S.
    Facebook, Google, Amazon, GE and any company with a digital strategy are likely looking East for their next big idea.
    https://blogs.csc.com/2017/02/02/2017-the-rise-of-the-sinosphere-and-the-digital-silk-road/

  5. Reblogged this on The Most Revolutionary Act and commented:
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    I’m still waiting for an update from Trump on his plans for Afghanistan.

  6. JAN 21, 2016
    China’s New Silk Road Won’t Have An Afghan Lane
    snip
    The New Silk Road’s land route would most benefit Afghanistan, a landlocked country that relies on Pakistan and Iran for access to seaports: If the proposed land route passed through Afghanistan, it would directly connect the country to Europe and the Far East.

    Unfortunately, present plans bypass the country.
    Afghanistan’s serious security challenges

    There are legitimate reasons why this is the case, starting with Afghanistan’s serious security challenges. Kidnapping and robbery, for instance, are commonplace on the Kabul-Kandahar highway. Insurgent attacks on the army and police are frequent as well, leaving passengers to wait for several hours until the fighting ends—and often risking their lives in the process.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2016/01/21/no-room-for-afghanistan-on-chinas-new-silk-road/#82f483573196

  7. FEBRUARY 10, 2017
    China, Copper, and Conservation at Mes Aynak

    Afghanistan, as a crossroads of empire and a key stage in the Silk Road, is dotted with important archaeological sites that go back 5000 years and can provide insights into the evolution of civilizations across Asia and, in fact, civilization itself.
    http://www.counterpunch.org/2017/02/10/china-copper-and-conservation-at-mes-aynak/

  8. a possible proxy war? Yet another in Afghanistan, if it happens. If not a proxy war using violence, maybe an economic proxy war.

    Interesting intrigued.

    • afghanistan war is the longest in modern history..and where is the end?

      • yes, the U.S. and NATO has been at war in Afghanistan since the 2001. Not long before that, the Soviet Union. Now the U.S. is sending even more troops, because of a “stalemate”. China wants a silk road through Afghanistan. Afghanistan was benefiting:

        “Signaling the start of a new “Sino-Afghanistan Special Railway Transportation Project” that can reduce trading costs between the two countries by (est.) 30%, two trains are now scheduled each month.”

        Now:

        “The New Silk Road’s land route… Unfortunately, present plans bypass the country. Afghanistan’s serious security challenges”

        All the big nations want something out of Afghanistan.

  9. ISIS 2.0. build up in Afghanistan & Philippines…

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