Japanese government planning to build 45 new coal fired power stations

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http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-31/japan-coal-power-plants/8224302?pfmredir=sm

The Japanese government is moving ahead with its plans to build up to 45 new coal fired power stations.

The power plants will utilise high energy, low emissions (HELE) technology that use high-quality black coal.

Japan is the largest overseas market for Australian coal producers, taking more than a third of all exports.

Tom O’Sullivan, a Tokyo based energy consultant with Mathyos Global Advisory, said in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011, Japan started importing more liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Australia.

But he said the move to more coal fired power was because coal was cheaper than LNG, and the energy security was priority for the government.

“Japan needs to import 95 per cent of all its energy sources,” he said.

“So it’s trying to diversify its fuel sources and it doesn’t want to be too reliant on any one market.”

Japan has ratified the Paris Climate Agreement and committed to a 26 per cent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by 2030.

But Mr O’Sullivan said Japan was yet to price carbon emissions.

“Although Japan spent $US36 billion dollars on commercial solar power last year, and is planning much more, there is no carbon price,” he said.

Mr O’Sullivan said while community and environmental groups had expressed concerns about the construction of a major coal power station, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was firmly behind the plans.

He said the decision would ensure the use of coal in Japan would continue well into the middle of the century.

“These guys [private companies] are not going to go ahead and [put money into] in large capital investments unless they have a 30-year depreciation period,” he said.

“So if they’re building these coal power plants now it is reasonable to expect them to be still on the books by the end of 2050.”

———-

but i thought coal was dead?

45..not 4 or 5..45!

“But he said the move to more coal fired power was because coal was cheaper than LNG, and the energy security was priority for the government. “Japan needs to import 95 per cent of all its energy sources,” he said.”

401

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~ by seeker401 on February 16, 2017.

6 Responses to “Japanese government planning to build 45 new coal fired power stations”

  1. This may have something to do with the emphasis on coal:

    “Toshiba, the embattled technology conglomerate, said it planned to write off more than $6 billion and withdraw from the business of building nuclear power plants as the impact of a disastrous bet on American nuclear energy continued to rock a mainstay of corporate Japan.

    “The trouble stems from Toshiba’s management of Westinghouse Electric Company, the American nuclear power business it acquired a decade ago. Westinghouse faces spiraling cost overruns at nuclear plant projects in the United States

    “On Tuesday, it put the size of the loss at 712.5 billion yen, or about $6.3 billion, which was near the top of analysts’ estimates.

    “Reactors that the company is building in the United States — at the Virgil C. Summer nuclear station in South Carolina and the Alvin W. Vogtle nuclear plant in Georgia — are about three years behind schedule and billions of dollars over budget. Plants in China are also taking longer than planned to complete.

    “Toshiba’s stock market value has shrunk by half since its warning about the loss from Westinghouse in December. In anticipation of the write-down, Toshiba said last month that it planned to sell its profitable microchip division. It also said it was re-examining the future of its nuclear business. Toshiba stock had dropped about 10 percent by midday Wednesday.

    “Westinghouse has been marketing an advanced reactor design known as the AP1000 and had set a target of selling 45 units globally by 2030. Mr. Tsunakawa said it would complete eight reactors that it has under construction and would go ahead with others it has proposed — in places like India and Britain — if it could find partners willing to take responsibility for building them.
    “But the number will obviously decrease” from the target of 45, Mr. Tsunakawa said.”

    —-
    About Its microchip division sell-off:

    “Ill-fated investments in nuclear power projects by Toshiba of Japan have already precipitated an embarrassing accounting scandal at the company. Now the company is selling its most valuable business to try to undo the damage.
    Toshiba, one of Japan’s oldest and proudest technology conglomerates, said on Friday it would spin off its microchip division. The business makes the information-storing “brains” inside millions of smartphones, digital cameras and other devices, and it has been the biggest contributor to Toshiba’s profits in recent years.
    The move is evidence of Toshiba’s desperation for cash after the punishing nuclear-related losses came to light last month.”

  2. Reblogged this on World Peace Forum.

  3. Trump signs bill undoing Obama coal mining rule

    http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/319938-trump-signs-bill-undoing-obama-coal-mining-rule

  4. Those articles above are 2017. This article is dated 2013. There has been a decline in nuclear demands, possible legal corruption in Japan and the U.S. (see above articles), poor construction management, and consequent job loss for some time. Natural gas is booming and seeker’s article on the possible coal revival, add other factors.

    http://triblive.com/business/headlines/3478880-74/westinghouse-gilbert-nuclear

    “Westinghouse Electric Co. will eliminate up to 660 jobs worldwide [5 percent of its 13,300-person global workforce] in the coming weeks, including some at its Cranberry headquarters, because of a global slowdown for nuclear power reactors.

    “In the nearly two years since the plant meltdown, governments in Japan, Germany and France have begun to scale back nuclear power.

    “The reactors at Fukushima were not Westinghouse designs, but were supplied by General Electric Co., Hitachi and Toshiba, which is Westinghouse’s majority owner with an 87 percent stake.”

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