Time to close down Gibraltar

https://www.rt.com/op-edge/384322-gibraltar-uk-taxes-money-laundering/

British sovereignty over Gibraltar stems from the same treaty that gave Britain a monopoly on the slave trade and granted Brazil to Portugal. It, like all these abominations, belongs in the dustbin of history.

The British ruling class was frothing with belligerent outrage last week following EU President Donald Tusk’s comments on Gibraltar in his letter to Theresa May.

Responding to the British Prime Minister’s letter formally requesting to leave the EU, Tusk noted that any agreement between the UK and the EU would not apply to Gibraltar without Spanish consent.

The statement was hardly controversial in itself, given that all member states already have a veto over any agreement, such is the nature of the decision-making in the EU. As Stephen Bush commented in the New Statesman, by giving Spain a veto over the terms of a future trade deal, Tusk was giving it “a right which it already has an EU member.” Indeed, compared to Ms. May’s thinly veiled threat to unleash terrorism against the EU should Britain not get the deal it wants, Tusk’s gentle reminder of the existing state of affairs was positively christlike.

Nonetheless, it was enough to provoke the full fury of British supremacism. The Sun newspaper devoted its entire front page to declaring “Hands off OUR rock” (helpfully translated into Spanish for the paper’s Iberian readers), while former Tory leader Michael Howard waded in with a threat to rerun the Falklands war. Current Tory Defence Secretary Michael Fallon appeared to embrace this approach with a promise that Britain will “go all the way” to keep Gibraltar under British rule, a classic euphemism for the use of armed violence.

All of this prompted a slightly bemused response from the Spanish, with Foreign Minister Alfonso Dastis commenting that his government was “surprised by the tone of comments coming out of a country traditionally characterized by its composure…it seems someone is losing their cool”, he added.

In fact, the longest rulers of Gibraltar were neither Spanish nor British, but North African Muslims. The word ‘Gibraltar’ itself comes from the Arabic name for the Rock – Jabat-at-Tariq, meaning “mountain of Tariq.” Tariq led the Umayyad conquest of Gibraltar in 711, and it remained, along with the rest of Spain, under Moorish control until 1462. Then, after two and half centuries of Spanish rule, Britain took the territory in 1704, its troops conducting mass burglary and rape, causing over 90 percent of the inhabitants to flee. In 1713, Britain forced Spain to cede the territory to Britain “in perpetuity” in the Treaty of Utrecht, turning it into another piece of Britain’s growing colonial jigsaw.

Effectively, places like Gibraltar, alongside other UK-managed territories such as the Cayman Islands, Bermuda, Jersey, Guernsey, the Turks and Caicos Islands, and the British Virgin Islands, were transformed into a giant global money laundering service. Local branches of the major London banks were established in each territory, taking in vast amounts of criminal wealth, which could then be safely transferred to each bank’s parent branch in London.

Today, the developing world is estimated to lose $1.25trillion per year in illicit wealth transfers to tax havens in this way, around ten times the rich world’s aid budget. As Shaxson puts it, “For every dollar that we have been generously handing out across the top of the table, we in the West have been taking back some $10 of illicit money under the table.” Eva Joly, a magistrate, involved in investigating the criminal use of tax havens, commented (this quote comes from the book above) that “It has taken me a long time to understand that the expansion in the use of these jurisdictions has a link to decolonization. It is a modern form of colonialism.”

Gibraltar is a major part of this criminal network. John Christenson, former Economic Advisor to Jersey, itself a major UK-run tax haven, noted that “the instruction from senior partners in London was to direct the really, really dodgy business away from Jersey to Gibraltar…[we] regarded Gibraltar as totally subprime. This was where you put the real monkey business.”

This was apparently confirmed in 2014, when OLAF, the European Anti-fraud office, revealed that it had “a number of concerns” over “cigarette smuggling across the border” between Gibraltar and Spain, including “indications of the involvement of organized crime.”

The following year, Spanish newspaper ABC reported that Gibraltar was home to no less than 15 organized crime gangs connected to drug smuggling, money laundering, and the Russian mafia. In 2008, Expatica.com reported that, according to Spain, “Gibraltar refuses to cooperate in investigations into money laundering, tax evasion and organized crime,” quoting a Spanish police official involved in anti-money laundering operations as saying that “we’ve reached a point where when we chance upon something related to Gibraltar in an investigation we prefer to leave it aside because we face a brick wall. It is useless trying to get information.”

———-

“British sovereignty over Gibraltar stems from the same treaty that gave Britain a monopoly on the slave trade and granted Brazil to Portugal. It, like all these abominations, belongs in the dustbin of history.”

uh huh..

history revision below..

“the longest rulers of Gibraltar were neither Spanish nor British, but North African Muslims. The word ‘Gibraltar’ itself comes from the Arabic name for the Rock – Jabat-at-Tariq, meaning “mountain of Tariq.” Tariq led the Umayyad conquest of Gibraltar in 711, and it remained, along with the rest of Spain, under Moorish control until 1462. Then, after two and half centuries of Spanish rule, Britain took the territory in 1704, its troops conducting mass burglary and rape, causing over 90 percent of the inhabitants to flee. In 1713, Britain forced Spain to cede the territory to Britain “in perpetuity” in the Treaty of Utrecht, turning it into another piece of Britain’s growing colonial jigsaw.”

and whats its usefulness?

“John Christenson, former Economic Advisor to Jersey, itself a major UK-run tax haven, noted that “the instruction from senior partners in London was to direct the really, really dodgy business away from Jersey to Gibraltar…[we] regarded Gibraltar as totally subprime. This was where you put the real monkey business.”

401

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~ by seeker401 on April 20, 2017.

8 Responses to “Time to close down Gibraltar”

  1. INSIDE THE WORLD’S TOP OFFSHORE TAX SHELTER
    BY LEAH MCGRATH GOODMAN ON 1/16/14

    http://www.newsweek.com/2014/01/17/inside-worlds-top-offshore-tax-shelter-245078.html

    this was a good article about Jersey and the Oligarchs.

    “It is the strategic aim of the government of Jersey to diversify the island’s economy, but it is also important that we continue to evolve and adapt as a well-respected finance center,” Jersey Chief Minister Ian Gorst told Newsweek in an emailed statement. (The chief minister is Jersey’s de facto president.) “This is something we have been doing for the last 50 years, and I hope we will continue to do it for many years to come.”Exactly one decade ago, Jersey slashed corporate taxes from 20 percent to zero, except for finance, which pays 10 percent. The shortfall left a hole in the island’s budget large enough to drive a truck through, according to British author Nicholas Shaxson, who wrote Treasure Islands: Uncovering the Damage of Offshore Banking and Tax Havens (Palgrave MacMillan, 2012).

    The solution: a tax on consumption that crimped the wallets of Jersey’s working class. “It’s a tax-the-poor-to-save-the-rich” approach, according to Pitman.Shaxson’s book highlights the view of a wealthy retired property developer living in Jersey: “I pay a quarter in tax terms of what the guy who collects my bins does. I play golf all day, while he probably can’t even afford to pay for the house he lives in. Living in Jersey is like that: If you’ve got the money, you get the cream.”Alas, that’s the rub. While Jersey’s riches pile up, there is a growing perception among the island’s working class that there’s one set of rules for the haves and another for the have-nots. Increasingly, high-ranking officials on the island have begun to speak out, stating that the problems go much deeper than class divisions and pervade the island’s body politic, parliament, law enforcement and even justice systems.

    “An absence of controls” and “absence of accountability” have left “the ordinary, decent people of Jersey helpless,” stated Jersey’s former deputy chief of police Lenny Harper in an affidavit he submitted before he retired in 2008. This came amid a wave of blistering criticism over his aggressive handling of one of the island’s worst-ever scandals: the systemic abuse of children that went largely ignored by his predecessors for decades.

    SYSTEMIC ABUSE OF CHILDREN!

    Encouraged by the States of Jersey Police, nearly 200 people came forward from all parts of the world to report they were victims of child predators on the island, naming more than 151 suspects – 30 of them now dead – according to a press release issued by the States of Jersey Police at the close of the investigation, dubbed Operation Rectangle, in late 2010.Among the high-profile attackers (who were never apprehended) reported to Jersey police was British disc jockey Jimmy Savile, accused of repeatedly abusing children and fond of traveling to Jersey where, ominously, he regularly visited children in care.

    Those who have reported him for abuse include both boys and girls who were at a government-run children’s home in Jersey, Haut de la Garenne.During Operation Rectangle, a dig under the home unearthed remains of children ages 6 to 12 years old, according to the press release from Jersey’s police, which added “no people are reported missing” and “there are no suspects for murder.”

    Fewer than a dozen suspects were convicted in Operation Rectangle, sparking widespread outrage from victims and those accused on the island.

  2. Great post, thanks; it would be great if you could do also do a piece on Ceute, Kings Corner, House of Dragons and the treasuries Alfonso X stole from the Moors which is driving the collateral accounts; thank you; in peace

  3. Reblogged this on UZA – a people's courts court of conscience.

  4. Reblogged this on World4Justice : NOW! Lobby Forum..

  5. Reblogged this on | truthaholics and commented:
    “oday, the developing world is estimated to lose $1.25trillion per year in illicit wealth transfers to tax havens in this way, around ten times the rich world’s aid budget. As Shaxson puts it, “For every dollar that we have been generously handing out across the top of the table, we in the West have been taking back some $10 of illicit money under the table.” Eva Joly, a magistrate, involved in investigating the criminal use of tax havens, commented (this quote comes from the book above) that “It has taken me a long time to understand that the expansion in the use of these jurisdictions has a link to decolonization. It is a modern form of colonialism.”

    Gibraltar is a major part of this criminal network. John Christenson, former Economic Advisor to Jersey, itself a major UK-run tax haven, noted that “the instruction from senior partners in London was to direct the really, really dodgy business away from Jersey to Gibraltar…[we] regarded Gibraltar as totally subprime. This was where you put the real monkey business.””

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