Bahrain state TV accuses Qatar of fomenting unrest in 2011

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-40953906

Bahrain’s state TV channel has accused Qatar of plotting with the kingdom’s main opposition grouping to stoke anti-government unrest in 2011.

It broadcast purported recordings of telephone calls between former Qatari PM Hamad bin Jassim al-Thani and Wefaq leader Ali Salman, in which it claimed they agreed to an “escalation”.

The Bahraini public prosecutor has begun an investigation into the calls.

Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Egypt cut links with Qatar in June.

The four countries accuse the emirate of supporting terrorist groups and of being too close to Iran – allegations the emirate has vigorously denied.

Qatar has condemned the land, sea and air restrictions put in place by its neighbours, which have forced it to import food by sea and air to meet the basic needs of its population of 2.7 million.

The state-run Bahrain news agency reported that the purported telephone conversation between Sheikh Hamad and Ali Salman “included an agreement between the two speakers on… how to deal with the situation then so as to exacerbate it and undermine Bahrain’s interests and stability”.

“This represents a crime of exchanging intelligence information with a foreign country to jeopardize the kingdom’s national interests,” it added. “The public prosecution will announce the outcome of the investigation as soon as it is over.”

There was no immediate comment from the Qatari authorities or from Sheikh Hamad, who stepped down as prime minister and foreign minister in 2013.

Sunni-ruled Bahrain has been wracked by unrest since security forces crushed pro-democracy protests mainly led by the majority Shia community six years ago.

The king brought in troops from neighbouring Sunni-led Gulf states to end the demonstrations and restore order. The unrest left 30 civilians and five police dead.

Activists say dozens more people have been killed in clashes between protesters and security forces since then, while bomb attacks blamed on Shia militants allegedly backed by Iran have killed a number of policemen.

Sheikh Ali Salman was jailed in 2015 after being convicted of inciting hatred, promoting disobedience and insulting public institutions, while Wefaq was dissolved last year for allegedly fomenting sectarian unrest.

———-

“The state-run Bahrain news agency reported that the purported telephone conversation between Sheikh Hamad and Ali Salman “included an agreement between the two speakers on… how to deal with the situation then so as to exacerbate it and undermine Bahrain’s interests and stability”.

this plays into the meme very nicely..from 2011..why bring it up now?

“Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Egypt cut links with Qatar in June. The four countries accuse the emirate of supporting terrorist groups and of being too close to Iran – allegations the emirate has vigorously denied.”

401

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~ by seeker401 on August 23, 2017.

7 Responses to “Bahrain state TV accuses Qatar of fomenting unrest in 2011”

    • https://www.azomining.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=184

      http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-31453951

      http://www.smh.com.au/world/chad-bans-burqa-hits-islamist-bases-in-nigeria-after-attacks-on-capital-20150618-ghro0n.html

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chad#Religion
      ” Chad is home to over 200 different ethnic and linguistic groups. The religions of Chad are Islam (at 55%), followed by Christianity (at 40%).
      The constitution provides for a secular state and guarantees religious freedom; different religious communities generally co-exist without problems.[62]”
      “The majority of Muslims in the country are adherents of a moderate branch of mystical Islam (Sufism). Its most common expression is the Tijaniyah, an order followed by the 35% of Chadian Muslims which incorporates some local African religious elements.[61] A small minority of the country’s Muslims hold more fundamentalist practices, which, in some cases, may be associated with Saudi-oriented Salafi movements.[62]”

      • and I ask – how on earth has the sufi (mystic) islam sprung in the hearth of Africa?!

        • Islam is animism. It is full of amulets, the eye of jealous (evil eye), talisman, jinn, demons, and sacrifice (Africa also has forms of animism, so not a far leap). The Arabian peninsula was animistic at the time of Muhammad and he was also influenced by Jews and small sects of Christianity that are long gone, e.g. for example to the latter Muhammad wrote in the Koran against the trinity of the father, Mary, and Jesus, which was a very small sect of Christianity that Muhammad was influenced by. There is no Christian that understands the Trinity the way Muhammad wrote about, but to Muhammad that was the Christian trinity – poor research on his part.

        • with all due respect, adirondack, I find your explanation very partial, restrictive and so untrue.


          very interesting article on the sufism vs. salafism in East Africa

          “The attraction of Salafism lies in the simplicity and accessibility of its theology; its absolute certitude; its disdain for hierarchy and intermediaries; and its emphasis on active faith. The true believer is not simply preoccupied with individual salvation; he or she is also an active agent for social change and for creating Dar ul Islam – a polity governed by sharia. It is these latter qualities that have allowed Salafism to tap youthful idealism effectively and attract idealists impatient for social reform and revolution. Salafi dominance in political, social and economic spheres is in no small part a function of this activist view of faith.
          Sufism, on the contrary, is a complex spiritual tradition whose form of mysticism and metaphysics may not be easy to grasp, especially by the young. In East Africa, pockets of Sufi traditionalists have survived and remain resilient, even though the number of active Sufi communities have shrunk. These include Lamu, on the Kenyan coast and central Somalia.
          Historically, Sufism has resisted mass conversion and favoured individual aptitude and voluntarism. The premium is on self-knowledge, enlightenment, and life experience – qualities that have traditionally attracted people advanced in age. Sufism has fostered quietism and a conservative outlook, and it will be interesting to see how its followers intend to recast it for a younger generation.”

          http://www.strathink.net/ethiopia/east-africas-sufi-path-to-countering-violent-extremism/

        • “Sufism everywhere, does not depend on the structure of an order for its existence. In fact, its very essence is the fulfillment of what every chapter of the Qur’an emphasizes: slavehood to God. Although the worship of God in Islam takes a physical form, sincere worship is synonymous with an absolutely internal humility: “And do you (O reader!) bring your Lord to remembrance in your (very) soul, with humility and reverence …” (Qur’an 7:205).”

          https://www.theislamicmonthly.com/sufism-slavery-in-east-africa/

          …the same teachings as those found in the mystic schools of Christianity….the official doctrine in late Byzantium, for instance, the heysihasm…what the cathars, exterminated by the pope-s church in the 13th century…like other declared “heresies” before and after…like gnosticism…

          God IS Love. for christians, muslims.
          who says otherwise has the intention to use religion for his political purposes.

          …that was in fact what Jesus came to correct in the jewish Fear/your/God/for/profit tradition, imo.

          • I agree with all the content in how Sufist Muslims view themselves, in which you laid out in your two comments. I was not speaking to their own internal motivations in response to their objects of reverence, or meaning. Not sure where my partiality, restriction, and untruth step into the picture. I strictly gave the historical account and practices of not only Sufist, but all Muslims.

            The only critique I provided was Muhammed’s view of the trinity and how no Christian, even anti-trinitarians, do not view the trinity the way Muhammed did. So my critique was of his “poor research” when it came to what Christians actually say the Trinity is. As I said above, everything else was simply an historical account and the current practices in the broad general sense of Islam.

            Maybe you could be more specific?

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